TDF Day #5 – More Corespinning

Cocoons

Tailspinning

Last night, I stayed up late. There was to be a webcast from CERN at 3AM, announcing success in the search for the Higgs boson. I’m working my way through jacey boggs’ swell book on textured spinning, spin art, and I welcomed the alone time in the wee hours – I could spin uninterrupted.

So, I picked up where I’d left off: Corespinning – Cocoons.

I collected a few bits of colored fiber (I’m not big on dyed fiber) and some of my lambs’ 2012 fiber (which I’d carded into batts) and watched the Corespinning section on the dvd again. Then, I read the bit on Cocoons. Clear enough.

First off, I pulled out a naked undyed batt of Curly Lumpkin, some yellow silk fiber, and some indigo dyed fiber from Curly’s Aunt Holly.  First attempt was not embarrassing, and actually, quite a lot of fun. Once again, I had a little trouble controlling the tendency for the yarn to be overspun.

My second attempt was spun from a batt of Mary’s fleece and her Mama Holly’s blue fiber for cocoons. This yarn came together well, was not overspun, but, I realized I was spinning a perfect thick-and-thin.

These little samples were a lot of fun to spin, and I know that I will be revisiting this technique soon. I can see these yarns knitted up, in my mind’s eye, and I like what I see.

Today, the 4th of July, is traditionally, a day for bbq and relaxation. So, I made a gigunda potato salad and a dry rub for a boneless pork roast, and picked some peppers and tomatoes and cukes and made a heck of a salad. We enjoyed a silent neighborhood. Not a firecracker. Not one. Not a car up or down the road. Not a kid yowling, hollering, or crying. We enjoyed the scene. We enjoyed strolling through the pasture. We enjoyed the day. I did not spin until the critters were all tucked in.

Next up was Tailspinning.

Now, it doesn’t take a genius to know that it takes clean curly locks to make a tailspun yarn. I had a handful. Literally, a handful. The locks I had came from a Border Leicester sheep, one of the funniest looking sheep, in my opinion, but one that grows some of the most amazing fleece around. I had dyed these locks with coreopsis way back when. Really, when, two or three years ago? So, that’s what I had. I used a superwash merino sockyarn as the core.

This was a very easy yarn to spin. Not a very easy yarn for my wheel to take up. The locks got caught on the spring clip that the yarn threads through on its way to the bobbin. Made me CRAAAAZY.  But, not much harm done to my psyche. That handful of locks was just enough to cover the few feet of unwindable core. Ta da. This won’t be a big favorite in my studio, until I add to my collection of, ahem, 1 spinning wheel.

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